News

  • 01/14/2020 - Through the years, Professor Mauro Nobili has pieced together evidence that shows the Tarikh al-fattash, a West African chronicle written in Arabic that is widely believed to have been produced in the 17th century, was in fact written by someone else entirely in the 19th century.

  • 11/26/2019 - History major Taylor Mazique's 'Election Candidates Crash Course' galvanizes first-time voters. “Yes, you’re 18, but you can vote,” Taylor says. “You have the right to vote, and your vote will matter. So go ahead and go do it.”

  • 11/22/2019 - Antoinette Burton, professor of history, has been named the Maybelle Leland Swanlund Endowed Chair, and Jeffrey Moore, a professor of chemistry, has been named the Stanley O. Ikenberry Endowed Chair. They were recognized during a recent investiture ceremony.

  • 11/05/2019 - Professor David Sepkoski works to realize the potential of bringing together the studies of STEM and humanities.

  • 10/17/2019 - Kristin Lee Hoganson, a professor of history who has been at Illinois since 2000, has been named the Stanley S. Stroup Professor of United States History. The position is named after Stanley Stroup, an Illinois alumnus who obtained his bachelor’s degree in history in 1966.

  • 10/01/2019 - Professor Poshek Fu discusses the on-going protests in Hong Kong within the context of the city's complex history which has placed it at the intersection of competing political and economic systems.

  • 09/30/2019 - Recent acts of racism, antisemitism, and prejudice on the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign campus—from the placement of a noose in Allen Hall over Labor Day weekend 2019 to the presence of a Holocaust denier on the quad on September 10—remind us of the grave dangers evident in the broad-ranging demonstrations of hate that are being encouraged in our current institutional, local, national, and global climate.

  • 08/20/2019 - As the 80th anniversary of the start of World War II in Europe approaches, Professor Peter Fritzsche discusses the radical and terrifying transformations in German society and politics ushered in during the first 100 days of the Nazi regime.

  • 07/17/2019 - In his new book "Another Kind of War: The Nature and History of Terrorism," History Department Emeritus Professor John Lynn seeks to contribute to "civic education and, in a sense, civil defense." The difficult - yet critical - lesson Professor Lynn instills is that “In dealing with terrorism, wisdom consists of knowing what not to do, as well as what should be done.”

  • 07/08/2019 - University of Illinois Emeritus Professor Winston Solberg's extraordinary life and career took him from Omaha Beach to the Ardennes during the Battle of the Bulge, to the faculty of Harvard, West Point and Yale, and finally to the UIUC History Department.

  • 06/11/2019 - On the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, Professor Kevin Mumford of the History Department discusses the legacies of the riots and their place in LGBTQ history and in the history of civil rights

  • 04/19/2019 - Good Morning Illini interviewed Professor Tamara Chaplin to discuss the tragedy of the Notre Dame fire and the role of the legendary cathedral in French history and national memory.

  • 04/17/2019 - Paris and the world were shocked to see Notre Dame in flames Monday, though its structure apparently has survived. The centuries-old cathedral is much more than an iconic tourist destination, according to Illinois history professors Carol Symes and Tamara Chaplin. They spoke with News Bureau social sciences editor Craig Chamberlain.

  • 04/10/2019 - Professor Kristin Hoganson's latest book "The Heartland" digs into the local history of where she lives and discovers a place very different from what she - and many Americans - expected to find.

  • 04/03/2019 - University of Illinois history professor Marsha Barrett is the recipient of a 2019 fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. er ACLS Fellowship will support work on a book about Nelson Rockefeller, in which she examines his career as New York’s governor to contextualize the decline of centrism and moderation in U.S. politics.