Class Schedule - Fall 2020

HIST 100 - Global History

Broad introduction to global history, by exploring the global structures and transnational forces that have shaped human history, from the emergence of agriculture and urban centers to our contemporary global village.

HIST 103 - A History of Everything: The Big Bang to Big Data

This introductory survey in "Big History" explores different scales of time as it places human history in larger geological, ecological, and cosmic contexts. Topics include the big bang, planet formation, the origin and development of life, mass extinctions, the emergence of Homo sapiens, the development of agriculture and cities, wars, plagues, and natural disasters, the advent of religion and science, political revolutions, industrialization and globalization, and human impact on the environment.

HIST 104 - Black Music

What is black music, and how do we know what we think we know about it? Together, we will examine musical creations pioneered by Africans and individuals of African descent over several centuries and across hemispheres. Doing so will allow us to consider the unity of the African Diaspora and its music, and also examine internal differences and diversity. Special focus is given to Latin America and the U.S., but, depending on the semester, we will also read about, listen to, and talk about music and musicians in Asia, Africa, and Europe.

HIST 111 - History of Africa to 1800

Survey of African history to 1800, or rather African "histories." Along with historical knowledge, it seeks to give students a basic familiarity with the geography of the continent, as well as to provide an overview of African languages. Through the analysis of secondary as well as of primary sources, students will be introduced to and further examine the development of pre-colonial African societies. Same as AFST 111.

HIST 120 - East Asian Civilizations

Surveys the three major East Asian civilizations from ancient and classical times, through the period of Western influence, political revolution, and modernization, to the contemporary age and the emergence of East Asian superpowers. Same as EALC 120. Credit is not given for both HIST 120 and EALC 135.

HIST 142 - Western Civ Since 1660

Fundamental developments - social, economic, cultural, intellectual, and political - in the history of mankind and Western society since 1660; includes the rise of modern science, the French and Industrial revolutions, the Romantic movement, the growth of nationalism and socialism, imperialism, urbanization, the Russian Revolution, Nazi Germany, the world wars, and the West and the developing world. Credit is not given for both HIST 142 and HIST 143.

HIST 143 - Western Civ Since 1660-ACP

Course is identical to HIST 142 except for the additional writing component. Credit is not given for both HIST 143 and HIST 142. Prerequisite: Completion of campus Composition I General Education requirement.

HIST 168 - A History of Judaism

Same as JS 120 and REL 120. See REL 120.

HIST 170 - US History to 1877-ACP

Course is identical to HIST 171 except for the additional writing component. Credit is not given for both HIST 170 and HIST 171. Prerequisite: Completion of campus Composition I General Education requirement.

HIST 171 - US History to 1877

U.S. history survey beginning with the diverse peoples who have populated North America since before the age of contact with Europeans and extending forward through the advent of European colonialism, the movement for independence, the foundation of the republic, the Civil War, and Reconstruction, ending in 1877. The course provides an introduction to historical interpretation, with particular attention to racialized and other forms of social, political, and economic inequality and struggles for freedom and democracy. Credit is not given for both HIST 171 and HIST 170.

HIST 174 - Black America, 1619-Present

Same as AFRO 101. See AFRO 101.

HIST 199 - Undergraduate Open Seminar

May be repeated.

HIST 200 - Intro Hist Interpretation

Through the careful examination of a specific topic or theme, this course provides a thorough introduction to historical interpretation. Particular attention will be devoted to research strategies, writing practices, handling primary and secondary sources, and the analysis of historiography. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours with permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HIST 203 - Reacting to the Past

An introduction to history through participation in role-playing games set in the past. Topics will vary each time the course is taught. Students will take on the roles of historical figures (famous or obscure) engaged in difficult and complicated situations, and will be obliged to adhere to the beliefs and circumstances of those figures while attempting to pursue a course of action that will help them win the game -- and possibly alter the course of history.

HIST 205 - Lived Experience in Latin America

Examining the history through the primary texts written by Latin Americans, this course introduces students to theories, contents and methods of historical inquiry, as well as the nuances and the complexities of Latin American history. Reading primary texts written by all strata of society, students will look through the eyes of the diverse populations in Latin America. Students will analyze the traditional narrative of Latin America and gain insight into the lived experience of Latin Americans. Together we will advance our individual and collective understanding of Latin America's rich and complex past.

HIST 213 - African Muslim Societies

Focuses on the history and historiography of Muslim societies in Africa. Investigates the dynamics of the spread of Islam in Africa, and explores differences in Islam in Africa from other areas of the Islamic world, with attention to the image in Western scholarship of Islam in Africa. Provides students with the knowledge and skills they need to understand this central phenomenon in modern world history. Same as AFST 213 and REL 215.

HIST 236 - Madness and Modern Society

This course provides a broad overview of the development of the mind sciences in modern Europe from the beginning of state-regulated asylums to the advent of pharmaceutical treatment and care in the community. Using a combination of primary sources and secondary texts, we will examine how the diagnosis and treatment of "madness" in its many forms has been shaped through the interaction of social, political, economic, and cultural factors from roughly 1750 to the 1990s. Same as PSYC 236.

HIST 240 - Ancient Greek Civilization

The history of ancient Greece and neighboring civilizations from the Archaic Period to the conquests of Alexander.

HIST 255 - British Isles to 1688

Survey of the political, social and economic, religious, and cultural history of the British people from the "prehistoric" era through the revolution of 1688. Same as MDVL 255.

HIST 259 - 20thC World from Midcentury

Economic, social, political, and cultural developments in twentieth-century world history from Second World War era to the present.

HIST 260 - History of Russia

Main themes and problems of Russian history from earliest times to the present.

HIST 262 - Zionism: A Global History

Examines the history of the Zionist movement. The course is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Jewish, European, or Middle Eastern history. The goal is to survey how Zionism emerged as a widespread political movement and, in the process, helped create an independent state for the Jewish people. In addition to familiarizing students with the backstory of a globally significant movement, this class will teach students historical interpretation skills. Same as JS 262.

HIST 263 - History of Medicine in the United States

Medicine and public health in the United States from the colonial period through the twentieth century. Topics include medical theories, therapeutic practices, and institutions as determined by science, culture, politics, law, and social structures. Additional attention will be paid to illness and epidemics; health care providers, patients, and public policy. Throughout, the course will highlight race, sex, (dis)ability, and other social categories that have affected medical care and been defined in medical terms. Same as GWS 263.

HIST 272 - Twentieth Century America

One major emphasis on foreign policy, including the emergence of the United States as a great power after 1898; a second emphasis on the Progressive movement and recurrent attempts at the reform of American society; and racial and urban problems and the conservation of natural resources included.

HIST 273 - Illinois History

History of Chicago and Illinois from prehistoric times to the present, illustrating the jarring conflicts and great achievements of peoples from all over the world. Politics, economics, popular and high culture, education, mass media, racial problems, and ethnic diversity are especially featured. There is an emphasis on the relation of city, state, and region to one another.

HIST 276 - Afro-American Hist Since 1877

History of Afro-Americans in the age of white supremacy; the rise of modern protest organizations; the era of integration; and the black power movement. Same as AFRO 276.

HIST 277 - Encounters in Native America

An examination of pivotal events in the history of Native peoples in North America. Students will explore the complexity of encounters between American Indians and others through a focus on key moments. These will include religious encounters, military confrontations, and legal struggles as well as social and artistic interactions. Same as AIS 277.

HIST 279 - Mexican-American History

Same as LLS 279. See LLS 279.

HIST 281 - Constructing Race in America

Interdisciplinary examination of the historical, cultural, and social dimensions of race and ethnicity in the United States. Explores the complex and intricate pursuit of multiracial and multicultural democracy. Same as AAS 281, AFRO 281, and LLS 281.

HIST 283 - Asian American History

Exploration of the migrations of peoples from the Asian continent into the United States, their attempts to build family and community, and their subsequent impact on American history. Same as AAS 283.

HIST 285 - US Gender History to 1877

This course surveys the history of gender formations in the United States to 1877. Although it pays some attention to manhood and masculinity, it focuses on the history of women from a variety of social groups and on gender ideas pertaining to women. Throughout, it considers the ways gender intersected with categories such as race and class as it placed women of different backgrounds in differential positions. Same as GWS 285.

HIST 300 - Topics in Film and History

Examines films as a significant medium of commentary on society and history. Explores the motives and careers of moviemakers, the ways in which films are influenced by their audiences, and how audiences' perception of historical processes are affected by films. Topics will vary. Same as MACS 300. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours if topics vary. Students may register in more than one section per term. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

HIST 307 - History of Mexico from 1519

Development of Mexico from the conquest to the postrevolutionary present.

HIST 311 - Global History of Intelligence

Examines the role of both diplomatic and military intelligence in the political history of major global events and developments from the nineteenth century to the present day. Studies the histories of several major intelligence organizations, as well as the roles played by smaller and non-institutional actors in the global production of intelligence. Focuses on the interplay between intelligence, state policy, and information environments to understand not only the role intelligence played in major events, but also how intelligence practices shaped and reflected political cultures across the world.

HIST 335 - Middle East 1566-1914

Political, social, cultural, and ideological developments in Egypt, Arabia, the Fertile Crescent, Iran and Turkey from the mid 16th century to the eve of World War I. Premodern society and institutions, the question of "decline" and "awakening", encounters with Europe and self-strengthening reforms, relations between Muslims, Christians, and Jews, the role of women and the family, class formation, and religion and nationalism. Same as JS 335.

HIST 338 - Egypt Since World War I

Examines the twentieth-century history of Egypt, emphasizing the internal social, political, economic, and ideological developments, with attention to Egypt's role in regional and international politics. Readings include novels and short stories to introduce students to modern Egyptian culture. Same as AFST 338.

HIST 347 - Protestant & Catholic Refs

New sources of secular power and spiritual authority define the age of the Protestant and Catholic Reformations. In this advanced European history course students expand their knowledge of the people, events, and ideas of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries while deepening their understanding of a wide range of primary sources created by theologians and peasants, nuns and monarchs, and artists and rebels. Key works by Luther, Calvin, and Loyola are placed in their intellectual and social contexts. Same as REL 347.

HIST 349 - Age of Revolution, 1775-1815

Comparative survey of domestic upheavals in the North Atlantic world: America, Haiti, England, Prussia, and France; the rise of Napoleon and the response of Europe; and the fate of innovation and reform in the immediate aftermath.

HIST 353 - European History 1918 to 1939

Survey of European society from 1918 to 1939, with emphasis on the impact of World War I, the Russian Revolution, fascism, and the intellectual trends of the twenties and thirties.

HIST 372 - America's Republic, 1780-1880

A study of political life in the U.S. during the century following the Revolution. The course covers the appearance and evolution of republican government, the Constitution, the expansion of voting rights, the rise and fall of political parties, and the relationship of all these things to the development of economic and social relationships.

HIST 387 - History of Sexuality in U.S.

Same as GWS 387. See GWS 387.

HIST 390 - Sport and Society

In various societies, organized sport has operated as site of nation-building, the struggle for inclusion, and indicator of societal advancement. Examines the history of the roles that sport has played in society through a series of topical foci, as selected by the professor each semester. Course readings revisit popular and scholarly debates about sport and discuss the different actors and social forces that shaped those discussions. Same as KIN 345. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 6 hours if topics vary.

HIST 398 - Internship in Public History

With a faculty sponsor, a qualified students will develop a program of study or research related to an internship or other relevant employment opportunity. Consult departmental undergraduate advisor or Director of Undergraduate Studies. Approved for letter and S/U grading. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of faculty sponsor and Director of Undergraduate Studies required.

HIST 399 - Independent Study

Readings in selected fields in consultation with the instructor resulting in a 20-30 page paper. May be repeated with permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing pursuing a History major; written consent of instructor and History undergraduate advisor required.

HIST 405 - History of Brazil from 1808

Problems of a neocolonial society; themes include family structure, slavery, imperialism, modernization, and the crisis of traditional institutions. 3 undergraduate hours. 2 or 4 graduate hours.

HIST 420 - China Under the Qing Dynasty

The period of Manchu domination in China (1644-1912); emphasis on Chinese reactions to Western influences during the nineteenth century. Same as EALC 420. 3 undergraduate hours. 2 or 4 graduate hours.

HIST 422 - Soc-Econ Hist Modern China

Disintegration of traditional social and economic systems during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and the political effects of that disintegration; examines changes in the agricultural economy, changing rural elites, urbanization, and emergence of new social classes. It is recommended that students take HIST 420 before registration in HIST 422. Same as EALC 421. 3 undergraduate hours. 2 or 4 graduate hours.

HIST 439 - The Ottoman Empire

Economy, society, law, and government; the Ottomans and Mediterranean society; Ottoman culture and Islamic tradition; minorities; trade, diplomacy, and capitulations; "decline" and dismemberment; and traditional and westernizing attempts at revival. 3 undergraduate hours. 2 or 4 graduate hours.

HIST 443 - Byzantine Empire AD 284-717

Examination of the political, social, economic, military, institutional, religious and cultural development of the early Byzantine Empire from the reign of Diocletian (AD 284-305) through the Heraclian Dynasty (AD 610-717). Same as MDVL 443. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

HIST 445 - Medieval England

Key sources and topics of English history, from the end of Roman rule in Britain (c. 410) to the fifteenth century. Recurrent themes include the development of law, the role of women, the status of commoners, intellectual trends, and the importance of public media for the dissemination of ideas (writing, performance). Same as MDVL 444. 3 undergraduate hours. 2 or 4 graduate hours.

HIST 453 - Sex and Science

Examines how modern scientific knowledge has shaped understandings and experiences of bodily sex difference, gender, and sexuality over time. It also focuses on understanding the ways in which social, cultural, and political expressions and issues of gender and sexuality have influenced biomedical and public health knowledge and practices. Thematic areas for discussion will include homosexuality, hysteria, eugenics, sex education, gender reassignment, and the AIDS crisis. Same as GWS 453. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

HIST 478 - Black Freed Move, 1955-Present

Same as AFRO 474. See AFRO 474.

HIST 486 - Revivalism and Evangelicalism

Same as REL 435. See REL 435.

HIST 490 - Honors Independent Study

Independent reading, research, and writing under the supervision of an individual instructor. Seniors in the History Honors Program taking this course in place of the Honors Senior Thesis must complete a substantive research paper (25-30 pages). No graduate credit. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours. Each 3-hour class must be taken with a different instructor. Prerequisite: Admission to the History Honors Program; or junior or senior of high standing with the consent of the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HIST 493 - Honors Senior Thesis

Two-term independent research and writing project under the supervision of a faculty advisor. Students enrolled in this course must submit a completed Honors Senior Thesis at the end of the second term, for evaluation by the faculty advisor and a second reader. 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. Must be repeated for a total of 6 hours. Students will receive separate grades for each semester's work. Prerequisite: Admission to the History Honors Program and consent of supervising professor; HIST 492 and HIST 495; concurrent enrollment in HIST 499 is required.

HIST 498 - Research and Writing Seminar

Capstone course required of all majors. Students will make history by researching and writing a work of original scholarship. Several of these seminars are offered each term and each focuses on a special topic, thus allowing students with similar interests to work through the process of gathering, interpreting, and organizing historical evidence under the direction of an expert in the field. The topics on offer each semester will be listed in the Class Schedule and described in the department's course guide at http://www.history.illinois.edu. 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

HIST 499 - Thesis Seminar

A required seminar for all seniors writing Honor Theses in history, this course will meet throughout the year and will supplement individual students' meetings with their primary advisors. Provides an intellectually supportive environment in which students work together on common methodological problems, share the results of their research, and critique developing projects. 1 to 2 undergraduate hours. 1 to 2 graduate hours. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 3 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the History Honors Program; HIST 492; and HIST 495. Concurrent enrollment in HIST 493 is required.

HIST 502 - Prob in Comparative History

Intensive comparative examinations of particular issues in the histories of multiple countries, cultures or periods; emphasizes methodology, the discipline of comparative history, and the nature of historiography in a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary context. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours.

HIST 510 - Problems in African History

Topics will be listed in the department's course guide at http://www.history.illinois.edu. Same as AFST 510. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours if topics vary.

HIST 560 - Problems in Russian History

Topics will be listed in the department's course guide at http://www.history.illinois.edu. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours if topics vary.

HIST 572 - Prob in US Hist Since 1815

Topics will be listed in the department's course guide at http://www.history.illinois.edu. May be repeated in the same or subsequent terms as topics vary.

HIST 591 - History and Social Theory

Introduces recent historical work drawing upon theories and concepts from the social sciences; considers fields of inquiry which include family history, demographic history, labor history, prosopographical and entrepreneurial studies, local and regional studies, and others.

HIST 593 - Approaches to History

Required course for entering history graduate students offering in initial foray into historiography, methods, and conceptual approaches for students in all fields. Provides experience dealing with three challenges that face all practitioners of the discipline: identifying the historical problem to be tackled, deciding what methodologies are best suited to that problem, and locating and then making use of the primary sources necessary for analyzing the subject at hand. Assigned materials, class discussions, and assignments will prepare students for the second semester required research seminar. Restricted to first-year graduate students in history.

HIST 596 - Individual Research Project

Directed research in special fields; may be taken in lieu of seminars in fields in which seminars are seldom offered. Topics will be listed in the department's course guide at http://www.history.illinois.edu. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours if topics vary.

HIST 597 - Reading Course

Directed readings in special fields. Primarily, but not exclusively, for students with a master's degree or equivalent, who are preparing for the preliminary examination in history and who need instruction in areas not provided by current course offerings. Approved for letter and S/U grading. May be repeated in the same or subsequent terms as topics vary. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

HIST 598 - Teaching of College History

Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Candidate for Ph.D. degree in history.

HIST 599 - Thesis Research

Individual direction in research and guidance in writing theses for advanced degrees. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated.