Class Schedule - Spring 2021

HIST 100 - Global History

Broad introduction to global history, by exploring the global structures and transnational forces that have shaped human history, from the emergence of agriculture and urban centers to our contemporary global village.

HIST 101 - History Now!

Teaches students how to apply historical thinking to present day problems. Each version starts with contemporary headlines about a current issue, moves to an investigation of its historical roots and legacies, and pivots back to the present to assess the impact of past history on present reality and to capture those relationships in a collaborative student project. It aims to show, in short, how and why history matters NOW.

HIST 120 - East Asian Civilizations

Surveys the three major East Asian civilizations from ancient and classical times, through the period of Western influence, political revolution, and modernization, to the contemporary age and the emergence of East Asian superpowers. Same as EALC 120. Credit is not given for both HIST 120 and EALC 135.

HIST 130 - History of South Asia

Multidisciplinary introduction to the history of modern South Asia from the consolidation of early modern state formations, the negotiation of religious, cultural and linguistic formations, European colonial interactions, and the rise of the modern nation states of Bangladesh, India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. Same as ANTH 130.

HIST 135 - History of Islamic Middle East

Introduction to fourteen centuries of Middle East history from the rise of Islam to modern times. Examines the development of Islamic thought, and of religious, social, and political institutions; as well as the transformations of the 19th and 20th centuries in the area consisting of Egypt, the Fertile Crescent, Arabia, Turkey, and Iran.

HIST 140 - Western Civ to 1660-ACP

Course is identical to HIST 141 except for the additional writing component. See HIST 141. Credit is not given for both HIST 140 and HIST 141. Prerequisite: Completion of campus Composition I General Education requirement.

HIST 141 - Western Civ to 1660

Fundamental developments in the history of Western societies from antiquity to early modern Europe; includes the Greek and Roman worlds, the influence of Christianity and Islam, the emergence of medieval monarchies, the rise of cities, the commercial and intellectual revolutions of the Middle Ages, the birth of the university, the conquest and colonization of the Atlantic world, the Renaissance and Reformation, the political and religious upheavals of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Credit is not given for both HIST 141 and HIST 140.

HIST 171 - US History to 1877

U.S. history survey beginning with the diverse peoples who have populated North America since before the age of contact with Europeans and extending forward through the advent of European colonialism, the movement for independence, the foundation of the republic, the Civil War, and Reconstruction, ending in 1877. The course provides an introduction to historical interpretation, with particular attention to racialized and other forms of social, political, and economic inequality and struggles for freedom and democracy. Credit is not given for both HIST 171 and HIST 170.

HIST 172 - US History Since 1877

Survey of U.S. history from the end of the Civil War to the present, focusing on struggles to achieve a multiracial democracy, the evolution of an industrial, urbanized, and pluralistic society, the intersections between domestic and global affairs, and the practice of historical interpretation. Epoch-making events and elites are considered in light of their relation to the activities and lives of ordinary people, including people of color, immigrants, women, and the working and middle classes. Credit is not given for both HIST 172 and HIST 173.

HIST 173 - US History Since 1877-ACP

Course is identical to HIST 172 except for the additional writing component. Credit is not given for both HIST 173 and HIST 172. Prerequisite: Completion of campus Composition I General Education requirement.

HIST 174 - Black America, 1619-Present

Same as AFRO 101. See AFRO 101.

HIST 191 - Freshman Honors Tutorial

Study of selected topics on an individually arranged basis. Open only to honors majors or to Cohn Scholars and Associates. May be repeated once. Prerequisite: Consent of departmental honors advisor.

HIST 199 - Undergraduate Open Seminar

May be repeated.

HIST 200 - Intro Hist Interpretation

Through the careful examination of a specific topic or theme, this course provides a thorough introduction to historical interpretation. Particular attention will be devoted to research strategies, writing practices, handling primary and secondary sources, and the analysis of historiography. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours with permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HIST 202 - American Environmental History

Introduction to the historical study of Americans' relationship with the natural world. Examination of the ways that "natural" forces have helped to shape American history; the ways that human beings have shaped, altered, and interacted with nature over time; and the ways that cultural, philosophical, scientific, and political attitudes toward the environment have changed from pre-history to the present. Same as ESE 202 and NRES 202.

HIST 211 - History of Southern Africa

Survey of major themes and events in Southern African history, with emphasis on the period after World War II: the inception and development of apartheid in South Africa, the growth of contests over African nationalism in the subcontinent, wars of liberation and the demise of white domination.

HIST 213 - African Muslim Societies

Focuses on the history and historiography of Muslim societies in Africa. Investigates the dynamics of the spread of Islam in Africa, and explores differences in Islam in Africa from other areas of the Islamic world, with attention to the image in Western scholarship of Islam in Africa. Provides students with the knowledge and skills they need to understand this central phenomenon in modern world history. Same as AFST 213 and REL 215.

HIST 219 - History of the Prison

Same as AFRO 221 and LA 221. See LA 221.

HIST 221 - Modern China

General introduction to the major themes of the Chinese Revolution from 1840 to the present, emphasizing the interplay between politics, ideas, and culture. Themes include the tension between cultural integrity and Western ideologies, between democratic participation and the tradition of centralized control, and the representation of cultural identity in high and mass cultures. Same as EALC 221.

HIST 222 - Chinese Thought and Culture

Same as EALC 222 and REL 224. See EALC 222.

HIST 241 - History of Ancient Rome

Survey of the political, social, economic, military, institutional, religious and cultural development of Rome from 753 BCE until 480 CE.

HIST 245 - Wives, Workers and Witches in Pre-Modern Europe

Examines the history of women and the evolution of concepts of gender in western Europe from roughly 400 to 1700. Topics include the interactions of class and ethnicity with women's experiences, the social construction of sexuality and gender, the misogynist tradition, and women's self-images. Same as GWS 245 and MDVL 245.

HIST 251 - Warfare Milit Insts & Soc

History of warfare and its relationship to changing technologies, tactics, and political structures, with an emphasis on the ways that military institutions are integrated with society as a whole. Same as GLBL 251.

HIST 252 - The Holocaust

Exploration of the Holocaust in historical perspective by examining European anti-Semitism, political developments in Germany, the rise to power of the Nazis, and the origins of the Holocaust with first-hand accounts, films, and historical texts, concluding with the legacy of the Holocaust in the contemporary world. Same as JS 252.

HIST 259 - 20thC World from Midcentury

Economic, social, political, and cultural developments in twentieth-century world history from Second World War era to the present.

HIST 264 - Technology in Western Society

Explores the role of technology as a transforming social force; examines innovations from the stirrup and heavy plow to the airplane and computer, that restructured economic and political life and realigned values; examines cultural representations of technology.

HIST 269 - Jewish History Since 1700

Explores how life was lived by Jewish women and men through the past three centuries. Will also focus on wider place of the Jews in European society, and the achievements and tragedies of the modern Jewish-non-Jewish relationship. Same as JS 269 and REL 269.

HIST 275 - Afro-American History to 1877

History of Africans in the Americas, surveying the African slave trade, slavery in the European colonies of the Americas, early United States slavery, and the Afro-American in the Civil War and Reconstruction. Same as AFRO 275.

HIST 276 - Afro-American Hist Since 1877

History of Afro-Americans in the age of white supremacy; the rise of modern protest organizations; the era of integration; and the black power movement. Same as AFRO 276.

HIST 279 - Mexican-American History

Same as LLS 279. See LLS 279.

HIST 280 - Caribbean Latina/o Migration

Study of the economic, political, and social forces which shaped migration, settlement, and community formation of Puerto Ricans, Cubans, and Dominicans living in the United States. Same as LLS 280.

HIST 281 - Constructing Race in America

Interdisciplinary examination of the historical, cultural, and social dimensions of race and ethnicity in the United States. Explores the complex and intricate pursuit of multiracial and multicultural democracy. Same as AAS 281, AFRO 281, and LLS 281.

HIST 287 - African-American Women

Examines the history of African American women, beginning with the West African background during the transatlantic slave trading era, emphasizing the experiences of black women in the United States during slavery and their political, civic, community and reform activities from slavery to the present, analyzed within the context of racism, sexism, and economic deprivation. African women in the diaspora, and the impact of feminism/womanism, Afrocentrism, and multicultural diversity on the African American woman are considered. Same as AFRO 287 and GWS 287.

HIST 300 - Topics in Film and History

Examines films as a significant medium of commentary on society and history. Explores the motives and careers of moviemakers, the ways in which films are influenced by their audiences, and how audiences' perception of historical processes are affected by films. Topics will vary. Same as MACS 300. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours if topics vary. Students may register in more than one section per term. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

HIST 311 - Global History of Intelligence

Examines the role of both diplomatic and military intelligence in the political history of major global events and developments from the nineteenth century to the present day. Studies the histories of several major intelligence organizations, as well as the roles played by smaller and non-institutional actors in the global production of intelligence. Focuses on the interplay between intelligence, state policy, and information environments to understand not only the role intelligence played in major events, but also how intelligence practices shaped and reflected political cultures across the world.

HIST 337 - Middle East Since World War I

Political-economic, social and ideological developments in Egypt, Arabia, and Fertile Crescent (including Israel), Iran and Turkey since 1918 to the present, including U.S. involvement.

HIST 344 - Early Modern British Isles

Social, economic, cultural and political history of the "four Kingdoms" of England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland between 1450 and 1800. Covers the Tudor and Stuart dynasties, Shakespeare, the English Civil War, the development of British colonial holdings across the globe, and the effects of empire at home.

HIST 354 - Twentieth Century Europe

Cultural history of Europe in an age of global warfare and political, social, and economic upheaval.

HIST 356 - The Modern Balkans through Literature and Film

History of the creation and development of the independent Balkan states during the 19th and 20th centuries. Special attention is given to Balkan nationalism, its roots, evolution and various manifestations. Other topics cover the modernization of the rural societies, ethnic conflict and/or accommodation, inter-Balkan relations, and the role of the great powers. Finally, a close look will be taken on contemporary developments in the Balkans, especially the Yugoslav crisis, the fall of communism and post-communist development. By discussing fictional work and films by Balkan authors, students will be introduced to the intellectual production of the region.

HIST 358 - History Harvest: Collaborative Digital Public History

Students work with instructor and community collaborators to host a "History Harvest," an event during which community members share personal stories about and artifacts related to a particular event, historical development, and/or place. The class will catalog the images and recordings gathered and use them to present digital exhibits. Readings include relevant historical works for context and methodological works on public and digital history skills needed for the project. Students will develop hands-on experience with these skills. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 undergraduate hours, if topics vary.

HIST 364 - The Science of Human Nature

Examines the history of scientific arguments about race, heredity, gender, and human biological difference. We will explore the historical, cultural, and ethical dimensions of biological thought through a discussion of topics including racial typology, eugenics, intelligence testing, modern genetic theory, sex and gender, and the human genome project.

HIST 367 - History of Western Medicine

Rise and development of medicine in the West since the sixteenth century; interrelations of physiology, pathology, and social demands with the theory and practice of medicine; pattern of professionalization; social role of the physician; conflict among ideas of medicine as an art, a science, and a social service; and problems of mental illness, medical ethics, and nontraditional forms of practice.

HIST 371 - The American Revolution

Examines the momentous founding age of United States history. Explores the growing estrangement of the American colonies from Great Britain and the culmination of this process in the Declaration of Independence. It then examines the controversial process of creating a new nation, and the government of the United States. Intense focus on primary source materials from the period.

HIST 374 - Civil War and Reconstruction

The United States' civil war (1861-1865) and the years of postwar "reconstruction" (conventionally dated as 1865-1877). During this period as a whole, the nation underwent its second revolution -- a revolution more radical in its impact than the one that freed it from the British Empire. Much about U.S. history for the next century and more was decided during these critical years.

HIST 381 - Urban History

Examines the history of urban centers, paying special attention to the relationship between the city and its surrounding territory, the impact of migration and immigration, the delineation of space and the transformation of the built environment, and the role of a city's inhabitants in creating social networks, political structures, and cultural institutions. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 6 hours if topics vary.

HIST 398 - Internship in Public History

With a faculty sponsor, a qualified students will develop a program of study or research related to an internship or other relevant employment opportunity. Consult departmental undergraduate advisor or Director of Undergraduate Studies. Approved for letter and S/U grading. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of faculty sponsor and Director of Undergraduate Studies required.

HIST 399 - Independent Study

Readings in selected fields in consultation with the instructor resulting in a 20-30 page paper. May be repeated with permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing pursuing a History major; written consent of instructor and History undergraduate advisor required.

HIST 400 - War, Soc, Politics, & Culture

Topics will be listed in the department's course guide at http://www.history.illinois.edu. 3 undergraduate hours. 2 to 4 graduate hours. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 undergraduate hours or 8 graduate hours in the same or subsequent terms if topics vary.

HIST 434 - Women in Muslim Societies

Same as ANTH 403, GLBL 403, GWS 403, REL 403, and SAME 403. See REL 403.

HIST 490 - Honors Independent Study

Independent reading, research, and writing under the supervision of an individual instructor. Seniors in the History Honors Program taking this course in place of the Honors Senior Thesis must complete a substantive research paper (25-30 pages). No graduate credit. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours. Each 3-hour class must be taken with a different instructor. Prerequisite: Admission to the History Honors Program; or junior or senior of high standing with the consent of the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HIST 492 - Historiography and Methodology

This is a seminar for all students in the History Honors Program and other advanced students interested in honors level study of historiography and methodology. Students intending to write a senior honors thesis should take it no later than the spring of the Junior year. Students will study the development of the historian's craft and will be exposed to new research methods and techniques. The course will culminate in the preparation of a research proposal, developed in consultation with an individual faculty advisor. The instructor of HIST 492 and the Director of Undergraduate Studies will assist students intending to write a thesis in the selection of an appropriate mentor. 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. Prerequisite: Admission to the History Honors Program or consent of the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HIST 493 - Honors Senior Thesis

Two-term independent research and writing project under the supervision of a faculty advisor. Students enrolled in this course must submit a completed Honors Senior Thesis at the end of the second term, for evaluation by the faculty advisor and a second reader. 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. Must be repeated for a total of 6 hours. Students will receive separate grades for each semester's work. Prerequisite: Admission to the History Honors Program and consent of supervising professor; HIST 492 and HIST 495; concurrent enrollment in HIST 499 is required.

HIST 498 - Research and Writing Seminar

Capstone course required of all majors. Students will make history by researching and writing a work of original scholarship. Several of these seminars are offered each term and each focuses on a special topic, thus allowing students with similar interests to work through the process of gathering, interpreting, and organizing historical evidence under the direction of an expert in the field. The topics on offer each semester will be listed in the Class Schedule and described in the department's course guide at http://www.history.illinois.edu. 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

HIST 499 - Thesis Seminar

A required seminar for all seniors writing Honor Theses in history, this course will meet throughout the year and will supplement individual students' meetings with their primary advisors. Provides an intellectually supportive environment in which students work together on common methodological problems, share the results of their research, and critique developing projects. 1 to 2 undergraduate hours. 1 to 2 graduate hours. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 3 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the History Honors Program; HIST 492; and HIST 495. Concurrent enrollment in HIST 493 is required.

HIST 502 - Prob in Comparative History

Intensive comparative examinations of particular issues in the histories of multiple countries, cultures or periods; emphasizes methodology, the discipline of comparative history, and the nature of historiography in a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary context. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours.

HIST 507 - Prob in Latin American Hist

Topics will be listed in the department's course guide at http://www.history.illinois.edu. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours if topics vary.

HIST 521 - Research Seminar: China

Research Seminar in Chinese history designed to provide training to graduate students in research skills with an emphasis on the use of source materials in Chinese language. Same as EALC 522. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 graduate hours in separate terms. Prerequisite: Proficiency in written Classical or Modern Chinese, EALC 500 for EALC graduate students, and HIST 520 for History graduate students, or the consent of instructor.

HIST 542 - Problems in Medieval History

Topics will be listed in the department's course guide at http://www.history.illinois.edu. Same as MDVL 542. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours if topics vary.

HIST 572 - Prob in US Hist Since 1815

Topics will be listed in the department's course guide at http://www.history.illinois.edu. May be repeated in the same or subsequent terms as topics vary.

HIST 594 - Intro Historical Writing

Seminar for first-year graduate students and is the second half of the introductory graduate sequence. Focuses on the process of writing an original piece of historical scholarship. Topics to be discussed include: developing an argument, exploring sources, arriving at a research strategy, planning and structuring an article, presenting complex data, and producing scholarship that is a coherent representation of an author's perspective on the past. Over the course of the semester, each seminar participant will develop and write an original, article length research paper. Students will work with the assistance of the instructors and an advisor from her or his own research field. Prerequisite: HIST 593.

HIST 596 - Individual Research Project

Directed research in special fields; may be taken in lieu of seminars in fields in which seminars are seldom offered. Topics will be listed in the department's course guide at http://www.history.illinois.edu. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours if topics vary.

HIST 597 - Reading Course

Directed readings in special fields. Primarily, but not exclusively, for students with a master's degree or equivalent, who are preparing for the preliminary examination in history and who need instruction in areas not provided by current course offerings. Approved for letter and S/U grading. May be repeated in the same or subsequent terms as topics vary. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

HIST 598 - Teaching of College History

Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Candidate for Ph.D. degree in history.

HIST 599 - Thesis Research

Individual direction in research and guidance in writing theses for advanced degrees. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated.